Sharing is caring!

For years women have fought for equality and an even playing field in the workplace. Being able to hold the same leadership roles as men, being able to receive the same pay as men, and simply being respected for being a woman in the workplace. We found it important and meaningful to tell the stories of women that experience these instances on a daily bases in their industries. Women that know what it feels like to be put on the back burner simply for being—a woman.

We analyzed women that experience major systematic issues and concerns: women that aren’t valued in their place of work, women that receive less, women that simply want more because of all they do. We listened, and we took on the task of telling their stories– their truths and their experiences, we surveyed women from all backgrounds. Women with high school educations to women with doctorate degrees, women who are mothers, women that make over $100,000 a year, women from different races, ages and ethnicities.

Take a first-hand look at these women– their roles and their experiences in the workplace: a movement of equity, equality and beyond.

Demographics: Elevating Women in the Workplace: A Movement of Equity, Equality & Beyond

It’s no secret that many women experience the lack of equity and equality in the workplace. We specifically targeted working women across the country in their various careers within our community to see how we could better help them elevate within their careers. The surveyed sample size consisted of 120 women from various states, cities, races, ethnicities, ages, educational and employment backgrounds. Here is what we reported:

Photo Courtesy of Working Women Survey: Demographics
  • Based on the women surveyed, 3% of those resided in Texas, with the second majority (12.5%) residing in California.
  • 3% of the survey participants were women, with 0.8% reporting as nonbinary and 0.8% reporting as genderqueer.
  • 51.7% of our survey participants were born between the years of 1986 and 1994. The remainder of the survey participants were born before 1986.

 

 

Photo Courtesy of Working Women Survey: Demographics
  • According to the reported results, 7% of the survey participants were African-American women, with 35% being White women, and 10% being more than one race/ethnicity.
  • When you discuss ethics and equality within the workplace, it’s no surprise that many minority women are experiencing this daily.
  • Sample Size: 120, Time Frame: 2 Weeks

 

 

 

Demographics: Elevating Women in the Workplace: A Movement of Equity, Equality & Beyond

Education and employment status are some of the most important factors in job security. In today’s world, these can be factors that unknowingly affect equity and equality within the workplace. The amount of education you may or may not have received can be a deciding factor in how others may view you—does it may it fair or accurate? Absolutely not. However, these are continuous problems that women in the workplace are facing every single day. Below are the reported results of the survey participant’s yearly income, educational background and employment status.

Photo Courtesy of Working Women Survey: Demographics

Of our surveyed sample size, 43.3% of the women obtained a Bachelor’s degree, with 30.8% obtaining a Master’s degree, and 10% obtaining an Associate degree. 4.2% obtained their Doctorate degree with 9.2% attending college but obtained no degree.

 

Photo Courtesy of Working Women Survey: Demographics

54.2% of the women survey made between $50,000-$100,000 yearly. Of that sample size, 4.2% made over $150,000 and 41.7 made $40,000 and below. Approximately 75% of the surveyed women are employed by either a company, organization or individual. 10.8% are small-business owners and 8.3% are self-employed and freelance workers.

 

Work-Life Balance: Elevating Women in the Workplace– A Movement of Equity, Equality & Beyond 

Work-life balance is defined as “the state of equilibrium in which demands of personal life, professional life, and family life are equal.” Being able to work within an organization that has a good work-life balance is what many people strive for, especially mothers. Of the sampled survey size, many women reported  having an average to good work-life balance.

Photo Courtesy of Working Women Survey: Demographics
  • 2% women reported having an average work-life balance.
  • 7% women reported not having any work-life balance.
  • 5% women reported having an extremely balanced work-life.

 

Being happy while in the work environment as well as outside of it also plays a large role for women in the workplace. If you aren’t happy, you tend to be less productive, and if you’re less productive then you’re less likely to receive a higher leadership role. This is also a huge factor in the advancement of equity and equality for women in the workplace. Below are the reported results on how happy these women are with their life outside of work.

Photo Courtesy of Working Women Survey: Demographics
  • 56% of the women reported being extremely happy outside of their workplace.
  • 7% of the women reported being extremely unhappy outside of their workplace.

 

Gender Biases: What’s it Like Being the Only Person that Looks Like You in the Workplace?

Gender biases in the workplace have been extremely prominent since the test of times. We asked women if they faced gender biases in the workplace, if they tend to feel as if they are less likely to be promoted over other genders, if they feel they are offered a lower salary than other genders, if they are held to a higher performance standard than other genders, if they’ve ever been passed over for a promotion or project that they deserved based on their gender, and lastly have they ever been mistaken for a lower level position than what they currently hold.

To our surprise, out report showed that many women do not feel as if they are less likely to be promoted over other genders and they don’t believe they’ve ever been pass over for a project or promotion that they deserved based on their gender.

  • 8% of the women said they do face gender biases in the workplace.
  • 2% of the women said they feel they are less likely to be promoted over other genders.
  • 3% of the women said they feel they are offered a lower salary than other genders.
  • 2% of the women said they feel they are held to a higher performance standard than other genders.
  • Surprisingly, 2% of the women said they feel as if they have been passed over for a project or promotion that they deserved based on their gender, whereas 60.8% disagreed.
  • More than half of the women (58.3%) reported being mistaken at work or with a client for a lower level position than what they truly hold.

 

Along with gender biases, being a woman in the workplace is greatly affected on things such as your age, your physical abilities and limitations, your body shape and size, your race and ethnicity, whether or not you have children, and your marital status. Alongside the lack of equity, women have even more to worry about while simply pushing the envelope forward to equality. Reported below are the aspects that have impacted these women’s work experience:

Photo Courtesy of Working Women Survey: Demographics

 

Who Run the World?! Girls!

The following statistics were reported by the women participating in this survey. These statistics indicate results in comparison to men in the workplace. Based on the findings below, this is what the women had to say:

Unequal access to internal information:
Taken less serious in the workplace:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unequal access to professional development opportunities, including time with leadership and mentors (formally or informally):
Unequal opportunities to achieve high ratings on performance reviews:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To participate in the Elevating Women in the Workplace survey, please click here.

Previous Post
Next Post

Leave a Reply

Watch my Videos